Filtering debate at NetHui 2018

Mandatory filtering of our internet by government agencies is appropriate in NZ

Facilitators: Shane Hobson & Andrew Cushen

Good cop Andrew & bad cop Shane will lead a discussion on the topic of internet filtering by NZ Govt agencies. Shane will take the affirmative, explaining that the benefits to society of filtering outweigh the costs, while Andrew will vigorously defend every New Zealander’s right to an open and accessible internet.

Bypass is pleased to announce our promotion to the NZTE F700

According to the NZTE, segmentation into F700 is based on a company’s willingness to engage with NZTE, ambition, capability and capacity to grow internationally and past international growth performance.

Our global network is currently processing 47.5 Billion DNS queries per second at peak.

NZTE has played an essential role in helping Bypass navigate international expansion. Of particular value, we’ve benefitted from the Beachheads advisors, who are a network of private sector experts who offer perspective and insights to help our customers grow internationally.

We’re pleased to see that NZTE has recognised our investment in establishing an office in India.

For Bypass, this means a more intensive account managed relationship, where NZTE provides strategic advice and some judicious, trusted advisor insight based on seeing what works across the export sector.

90% of customers agree or strongly agree that NZTE has added value to their business.

We look forward to continuing to strengthen our working relationship with them to support our international growth.

About NZTE
New Zealand Trade and Enterprise is New Zealand’s economic development and trade promotion agency. New Zealand Trade and Enterprise helps companies grow internationally, bigger, better and faster, for the benefit of New Zealand.

Robi Safenet keeps children safe on the internet

Auckland/Mumbai: January 29th, 2018 – Leading digital company, Robi, has once again revolutionised Bangladesh’s digital landscape by introducing Robi Safenet – a unique service that allows parents to protect their children from harmful content on the internet through filtering.

Robi Safenet uses intelligent risk detection algorithm to allow/ block specific sites that are inappropriate for children. The service also allows parents to control when their child can use the internet. This is particularly useful to ensure child’s complete focus on their studies. Besides, it allows custom blocking of non-listed app/ URLs that are harmful for children.

In order to subscribe to the service, Robi customers need to visit www.robisafenet.com. Once subscription is done successfully, the parents can add their child’s number to start protecting them from the negative aspects of internet. Subscription to this service is free till the end of February 2018.

 

Commenting on the launch of Safenet, Robi’s Chief Commercial Officer, Pradeep Shrivastava said: “Digital lifestyle is rapidly becoming mainstream in Bangladesh. The imminent launch of 4G service is expected to accelerate this encouraging trend by manifolds. While such changes certainly bodes well for the socio-economic and personal development, it potentially exposes our children to the harmful aspects of internet. As a responsible company, Robi has empowered the parents to ensure their child’s safety on the internet through Robi Safenet. We are confident that this unique service will emerge as the key tool to ensure proper mental growth of our children in the society.”

This service has been launched by Robi in partnership with Bypass Network Services Limited, New Zealand and Ekaga Futuristics Private Limited, India. For further details about the service, Robi customers can visit www.robisafenet.com.


 

About Robi Axiata Limited

Robi Axiata Limited (“Robi”) is a subsidiary company of the Asian telecom giant, Axiata Group Berhad based in Malaysia. Robi is the second largest mobile network operator in Bangladesh. Robi has introduced many first of its kind digital services in the country and has invested heavily to take its mobile network to the underserved communities even in the rural areas. Other shareholders in the entity are Bharti Airtel International (Singapore) Pte Ltd and NTT DOCOMO Inc.

 

About Bypass

Bypass creates technology for telecommunications marketing teams to differentiate their brand and increase revenue. Bypass provides filtering services which keep kids safe online and helps telecommunications service providers meet industry regulated compliance requirements.

 

About Ekaga

Ekaga Futuristics Private Limited has been setup to address the gap which withholds the latest global innovators to enter into the South Asian market. Ekaga brings in Service Innovation to help such global start-ups enter the market. Ekaga Futuristics Private Limited is a partner of Bypass Network Services Limited for their operations in South Asia.

Telcos missing from Australia Online Safety on the Edge Conference

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We have just returned from the Online Safety conference held in Sydney on Nov 1 – 3. The conference was jointly hosted by the Australian eSafety Commission and NZ’s own Netsafe.

The event was well attended with over 400 delegates and a range of interesting speakers. We shared a table with Antigone Davis, Head of Global Safety for Facebook. She explained some of the tools that Facebook is using to help keep people safe online including their processes for taking down image based abuse after it has been posted online. Antigone went on to explain measures that Facebook is employing that allow people to pre-emptively block private images before they are posted onto Facebook. This is a significant step forward in stopping online image based abuse before it occurs.

The majority of delegates were from groups who provided training or support to young people helping them to be safe online or to assist those who had been victimised online.

There was only a small number of representatives from the online or telco industries suggesting a lack of awareness or sense of responsibility for the role we play helping to keep people safe in the online environment we’re creating.

Nearly all the presenters had an upbeat, positive story to tell about their work. The exception was a case study presented by the Child Exploitation Internet Unit of the New South Wales Police Force. This was a “warts & all” case study that took us through the detection, capture & conviction of five Australian child sex offenders  We were able to read the text messages and chats exchanged by the abusers, listen to their recorded phone calls and watch their police interviews. In this case all five offenders were convicted and imprisoned. This was a truly chilling presentation that gave a small insight into the world of child sex offenders and reinforced the value of our work.

This huge issue in the Australian household, & the perfect organisation to really help is the broadband provider. Bypass’ network level parental control – Buddy Guard is designed to help the service provider with a fast deployment model & tools to help with the challenges that families are currently facing in the home. It’s just one way the broadband provider plays a part in the wider ecosystem, with online content players & government to prevent children from harm online.

Is the Aussie ISP a threatened species under NBN regime?

Andrew Khoo, Solutions Architect at AmaySIM spoke at AusNOG in Melbourne last week and explained that Australian ISPs are experiencing high levels of churn and reduced margins as the NBN is rolled out across Australia. Especially for ISPs outside of the “big 4” who don’t have the capacity to connect directly to all 121 NBN inter-connect points and are forced to buy the NBN service through an intermediary.

This is very similar to the NZ situation as the local government rolls out the UFB (Ultrafast Broadband Network) to around 87% of NZ premises. While the NZ UFB has a much lower barrier to entry for smaller ISPs, there is still enormous pressure on the small and mid-tier NZ ISPs from the large ISPs who offer multifaceted services.

Those multifaceted services include mobile and power being offered by a traditional telco (Slingshot), a Vocus brand and internet service being offered by electricity generators (Trustpower). These are all situations where cross-subsidization could occur between different services giving the large ISP an advantage over the smaller operator.

In both NZ & Australia, the fibre rollout has led to a land grab by ISPs as they take advantage of customer churn, driven by the awareness of new services available over the fibre networks not available on the copper networks such as high-resolution video streaming and multi-subscriber video streaming.

The NZ ISP market leads Australia by several years, so it is simple for Australian ISPs to see their future by looking across the Tasman to their NZ peers. There is still room for ISPs in Australia to bring other services into the mix (such as energy retailing) which will hit ISPs hard who are already struggling due to low margins and no significant point of difference from their competition.

ISPs selling over NBN need to evolve too rapidly to avoid extinction.  The quote that comes to mind is from Korean business theorist, W. Chan Kim who said in his Blue Ocean Strategy book, “The only way to beat the competition is to stop trying to beat the competition.” This is usually interpreted as instead of trying to beat the competition, do something different; precisely what the NZ ISPs who are crossing over into electricity resale are doing.

New Zealand ISPs are differentiating by adding related services to their internet service. Stuff Fibre (a one-year-old fibre ISP) has found good traction offering a parental controls service to their customers. This has immediate appeal to families with school-age children and provides a tangible point of difference from their competitors who talk about benefits such as internet speed and price.

Instead of competing based on price, speed and data they provide the end user with a point of difference that addresses a key concern in every family home with school-age children, how do we manage screen time?  

Talk to any parent in Australia, and you’ll know their kids see their device as an extension of themselves, as digital natives, and use the demands of homework to justify being online 24/7. They’ll tell you their teens stay up too late chatting with their friends, and this causes health concerns and issues with being tired at school.

We accept the Internet has more pro’s than con’s but have you ever thought about how helping your end users deal with a major breakdown will enhance your offer and improve your financial results?

Read More – Value Added Services Enhance ISP Growth

Is your network NFV ready?

Network functions virtualization (NFV) is an initiative to virtualize the network services that are now being carried out by proprietary, dedicated hardware. NFV is designed to decrease the amount of proprietary hardware that’s needed to launch and operate network services.

This fundamental shift from physical to virtualized network functions with NFV is the next step forward for communications service providers. The ability to move traditional core network services such as routers and firewalls onto virtual machines will allow organisations to quickly respond to the demands put on their network in a cost-efficient and flexible manner.

 

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Source: Spirent

Operators who are poised to begin adopting these new technologies and can deliver new products to their customers much faster using over fully virtualized networks. This is because value added services like Buddy Guard sit inside a resource catalogue, inside be the central location for building and defining these new products, exposing them to your sales channels and delivering them with zero-touch automation. This enables customers to turn on new services in minutes, using a self-service portal. With NPV the time-to-market is greatly reduced, and service automation and virtualization drive down deployment and operational costs.

NFV enables telecommunication providers the capability to offer new services to our customers in a very agile and flexible way, and the capability to bring up new functionalities on our network very quickly, coming from multiple partners.

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Source: Juniper

This new model means that security performance in NFV will be key. With the bulk of the applications is moving to a cloud infrastructure, that means the security must be inside the virtualized cloud. This requires a focus on the so-called east-west traffic that is changing hands in the data centre at the virtualization layer. Buddy Guard uses a stateful security model – in which all applications are monitored in real-time — to provide enhanced security for east-west traffic within the app and the data centre, implemented closest to VMs and containers.

Speak with us about out NPV Ready Network Level Parental Controls Platform and NPV Router Strategy today.

Bypass to speak at SANOG28 & DESCON2016

IP geo-location issues were brought into mainstream discussion in New Zealand when Bypass & 15 telecommunications companies were served an injunction to stop operating the world’s first wholesale network level geo-location technology.

The countries two public TV broadcasters, the pay TV operator and the incumbent telecommunications provider worked in unison to shut down geo-unblocking for copyright reasons. This was despite overwhelming public opinion against their move, legal precedent for physical goods parallel importing and the right for the consumer to remove a technical prevention measure so they could watch out of regional zone DVDs.

Since then Bypass reinvented the technology to provide a safe kid experience, with some major differentiators which were developed when we had to figure out how to manage default hard coded DNS settings in an efficient manner. As a result, the managed kid safe app scales to support 10M+ users on a single basic off-the-shelf server, soon to be 3-4x this if R&D continues the way it’s going.

SANOG28 is being held at Trident, Bandra Kurla in Mumbai the first week of August. Bypass has been invited to present about geo-unblocking and explain how geolocation has evolved. For the first time in a public forum, Bypass will explain how the network transparently intercepted DNS to provide end users with an open Internet experience free from country based restrictions.

Then our CCO Matthew is heading up to Europe to provide the Keynote talk at the DesCon 2016 IoT Hackathon in Serbia. The Internet of Things, or IoT, has emerged as the next technology mega-trend. It refers to connecting to the Internet billions of everyday devices – ranging from fitness bracelets to industrial equipment.

 

DesCon HAckathon

This trend is occurring as the physical, and online worlds merge, opening up a host of new opportunities and challenges for companies, governments and consumers. Interesting enough all IoT devices use DNS so security in the home to see threats from devices regularly calling home is something the technology stack is capable of doing.

The theme for DesCon 2016 is #Fun #Alertness. In the future fashionable devices, wearables and garments will be a part of our daily lives, they will alert us to activities, provide warnings or alert us to useful information about our location. Teams of hackers will spend the weekend creating software to connect physical objects to the Internet in a new and interesting way using sensors, Arduino kits to build wearable fashion items and IoT devices capable of taking and measuring data both from the atmosphere and human bodies.

Matthew will be discussing the repercussions of IoT and how they apply across the business spectrum. The goal is participants will begin to understand how to think strategically about adapting existing business models, security and operations to take advantage of IoT.

Matthew’s secret weapon is innovation from a New Zealand wearable sensor company StretchSense who create wearable motion capture sensors  that measure stretch, pressure, bend, and shear.